Category Archives: Tools

RhymeZone – Find rhymes, synonyms, and more

RhymeZone is a great website to see how a word is used in the context of famous quotes, poems, and plays, but also an easy way of finding rhymes and a whole lot more. Here’s a brief overview of what Rhymezone can do for you:

Find rhymes: This function will return words that exactly rhyme with the word you typed in.
Find near rhymes: This function will return words that almost rhyme with the word you typed in.
Find synonyms: This function will return words that are the same or similar in meaning to the word you typed in.
Find anonyms: This function will return words that can mean the opposite of what you typed in.
Find definition: This function will search for definitions of the word you typed in. It will also allow you to submit your query to other online dictionaries on the Web.
Find homophones: This function will return words that have exactly the same pronunciation as what you typed in but are spelled differently.
Find similar sounding words: This function will return words that have a pronunciation that’s similar, but not necessarily the same, as what you typed in.
Match consonants: This option will return words that have the same pattern of consonant sounds. Phonetic, for example, will return fanatic.
Find related words: This option will return words that are related in some important way to what you typed in.
Find similar spellings: This option will return words in the dictionary that are spelled similarly to what you typed in. Use this feature to spell-check a word that you aren’t sure of.
Match these letters: This option will return words and phrases that contain the letters you type in.
Search for pictures: This function will search for kids-friendly pictures on the Web related to the word you typed in.
Search in Shakespeare: This function will search all of Shakespeare’s plays and poems for your word.

Use Text-to-Speech Functions for Better Proofreading


Ever proofread an email and realize after you have sent it that it contains a glaring error? You know those errors — these are the ones that you miss because your brain inserts the missing word or overlooks spelling errors such as “wiht” that really should be “with.”

The Unofficial Apple Weblog has a solution we have been using here at translabor for quite a while and we would highly recommend this method too: “The best way to avoid some of these common errors is to read your writing aloud so you can hear what you have written. If you are unable to talk aloud or feel silly doing so, you can take advantage of the text-to-speech feature available on your iPhone or Mac and let your device read to you instead.”

Lifehacker has the link for Text-to-Speech using Windows, Android and Chrome.

Google’s New Spell Check

Lifehacker points out that Google Docs just “updated its spell checker! Sure, in theory that’s a “what could be more boring” scenario. But you guys, it’s pretty awesome.

The updated spell checking bakes in the power of Google’s “Did you mean” technology, meaning that instead of relying on a static dictionary, it uses the context of your word alongside Google’s powerful “Did you mean” database to learn new words, offer spelling suggestions based on context rather than just similarity, and that it can even catch typos when the misspelled word is just the wrong dictionary word. The advantages spelled out in more detail, from the Google Docs blog:

1. Suggestions are contextual. For example, the spell checker is now smart enough to know what you mean if you type “Icland is an icland.

2. Contextual suggestions are made even if the misspelled word is in the dictionary. If you write “Let’s meat tomorrow morning for coffee” you’ll see a suggestion to change “meat” to “meet.”

3. Suggestions are constantly evolving. As Google crawls the web, we see new words, and if those new words become popular enough they’ll automatically be included in our spell checker-even pop culture terms, like Skrillex.

Antique Typewriters

Some of you may recall that there was a time before the computer. Translators had to work with what they called typewriters and the stunning Martin Howard Collection of Early Typewriters gives a you a pretty good overview what those things looked like in the 1880s and 1890s. So, next time you complain about your word processor, give one of those old school machines a try. Mister Howard is also selling typewriters and those things would probably look lovely at most offices.

Leo’s little helpers – Integrating the dictionary in operating systems

Have you seen those useful little toolbars & bookmarklets for your Internet browser? Those might save you some time here and there.


Wordsmyth is an online dictionary and thesaurus that includes a variety of different dictionaries (beginner’s and children’s among them) and other tools, including an anagram solver, reverse search, glossary maker, and crossword solver.

Twitter me this auf Deutsch brings the world’s top celebrities to you, in your own language!

Don’t believe in gossip – read it directly from your favorite stars. works in 58 languages, everywhere in the world.

Image by Filippo Minelli. More from his great series “Contradictions/Ongoing”.

Linguee – A translators best friend

“Linguee is more than a German-English dictionary. With Linguee, you can search many millions of bilingual texts in English and German for words and expressions. Every expression is accompanied by useful additional information and suitable example sentences.

What is the benefit?

When you translate texts to a foreign language, you usually look for common phrases rather than translations of single words. With its intelligent search and the significantly larger amount of stored text content, Linguee is the right tool for this task. You find:
– In which context a translation is used
– How frequent a particular translation is
– Example sentences: How other people translated an expression

By searching not only for a single word, but for a respective word in its context, you can easily find a translation that fits optimal in the respective context. With its large number of entries, Linguee often retrieves translations of rare terms that you don’t find anywhere else.”

Translate the real world with Google Goggles

Traveling to another country can be an amazing experience. The opportunity to immerse yourself in a different culture can give you a new perspective. However, it can be hard to fully enjoy the experience if you do not understand the local language. For example, ordering food from a menu you can not read can be an adventure. Today we are introducing a new feature of Google Goggles that will prove useful to travelers and monoglots everywhere: Goggles translation.

Here’s how it works:
Point your phone at a word or phrase. Use the region of interest button to draw a box around specific words. Press the shutter button.

If Goggles recognizes the text, it will give you the option to translate
Press the translate button to select the source and destination languages.

The Google Mobile Blog has more.

Virtual Keyboards on Non-English Search Portals

“This hasn’t been formally announced by Google yet, but industry blogs are picking up on it and so are our readers: the company has started to include buttons that open up virtual keyboards when doing a search on non-English search portals.

You can see the buttons when you run a search on Google’s main search service pages for Russia, Israel, Poland, Croatia, Palestine, Czech Republic and plenty more.

Clicking the button opens a virtual keyboard (see screenshot above), which can be dragged to anywhere on the screen by clicking the blue bar at the top. You can also use the up and down arrows to show more characters commonly not present on physical keyboards.

The basic idea behind the virtual keyboard is that users can enter the precise search terms they want, regardless of the language keys on their real keyboards. As Google points out on its support pages, this can prove particularly helpful to people who use one of the many non-Latin script-based languages that require special characters such as Arabic, Greek, and Thai.”



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